Water is Sacred - Feds say no to DAPL Pipeline

on . Posted in News

By Rich Winter

Amidst freezing temperatures, snow covered ground and among thousands of protestors, including U.S. Veterans from across the United States, tears of joy and whoops of celebration, chanting and drumming rattled the North Dakota landscape when it was announced the Army Corp. of Engineers would be looking for an alternate route and undergoing further environmental studies before any permanent decision about the Dakota Access pipeline would be made. 

Standing Rock Sioux, Tribal President, Dave Archambault, called the stoppage of the pipeline a monumental day for his people. 

“This is an historic moment,” Archambault said in a prepared statement. “For centuries, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and tribes across the country, have faced fundamental injustice at the hands of the federal government - which time and again took our lands and tried to destroy our way of life. Our Treaties and our human rights were ignored, our interests in protecting lands and waters were considered unimportant, and our voices were not heard.”

Archambault said the action by the Army Corps of Engineers strongly vindicates what the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has been saying all along - That they had a responsibility to protect our waters for future generations. 

The decision to not grant the easement for the pipeline to go under Lake Oahe, drew immediate condemnation from North Dakota politicians, and the energy partners behind the pipeline. 

Energy Transfer Partners and Sunoco Logistics Partners, the corporations behind the Dakota Access Pipeline, said in a statement Sunday night they “fully expect to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting in and around Lake Oahe.”

The company suggested Sunday’s decision doesn’t change past court decisions.

“Nothing this Administration has done today changes that in any way,” the company said in a statement.

North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven, a Republican, said last week after a meeting with the transition team that Trump supported completing the 1,172-mile long proposed pipeline, that would transport 470,000 barrels of oil a day across four states. A spokeswoman for Trump did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Sunday’s decision.

House Speaker Paul Ryan tweeted his criticism, calling the intervention “big-government decision-making at its worst. I look forward to putting this anti-energy presidency behind us.”

It was that kind of talk that had Rosebud Sioux Tribe President, Willie Kindle cautiously optimistic Monday morning in council chambers.

“We’re pretty happy with what the Corp.  decided to do,” Kindle said. “We met with them two weeks ago up in Rapid City, we pleaded our case to them as to why they shouldn’t issue that permit. Apparently they listened, however, I don’t want to be too optimistic about it because when they change administration’s, this could all change again.” 

Protesting in prayer: 

Since the protests began earlier this year, messages from both native and non-native spiritual leaders has always been to protest in a peaceful manner. Mother Lauren Stanley, an Episcopal priest on the Rosebud, made several trips to North Dakota. This past weekend, Stanley was asked to be a trauma chaplain with worries of Veterans in attendance being affected by PTSD (Post-traumatic stress disorder) because of the stress of the situation and the sheer enormity of thousands of people all gathered together in peaceful protest. 

“I truly believe that the Standing Rock tribe’s commitment to prayer and peacefulness made all the difference in defeating the Dakota Access Pipeline,”  Stanley said. “From Chief Arvol Looking Horse and Chairman Dave Archambault and leaders like LaDonna Allard and Phyllis Young and so many others, the message has been the same: This stand against the pipeline has been based in prayer and peace. And as a woman of prayer myself, I can say that those prayers, and that commitment to peace, made this victory possible.”

Stanley was called to be one of 32 experienced trauma chaplains to work with the thousands of veterans who came to the Standing Rock this past weekend for the veterans’ action. “To be here on the very day that the Army Corps decided definitely that there would be no permit is incredible. Like so many here, I cried at the news.”

Danny Gangone, who works with the Rosebud Episcopal Mission, has been to the Standing Rock numerous times, bringing supplies and working in the Sacred Stone camp. He was helping put up a tent for chaplains when he heard the call to the sacred fire. 

“I was humbled by the joy I saw in our people,” he said. “I was and am proud of our people. You could feel the emotional response from everyone in the camps when we all got the news.”

Archambault echoed feelings of prayer being a major contributor that led to Sunday’s decision. 

“With peace and prayer, indigenous people from hundreds of Tribes said: our future is too important. We can no longer be ignored. The goal was to protect these sacred waters, and to do so in the name of our children,” Archambault said. “And, with yesterday’s decision, it is clear that our voices have at long last been heard.” 

While Sunday’s decision from the Government does not guarantee the pipeline won’t eventually find it’s way under Lake Oahe, Archambault, and many other’s concerned about possible destruction to the environment celebrated what they said is a monumental victory. 

“While today is a great day, there is still much that needs to be done to protect Tribal rights and ensure justice for indigenous people everywhere,” Archambault said. “Using peace and prayer as our guideposts, and with the teachings of our elders and with inspiration from our youth, I believe there is much we can accomplish for the future.”

 

Local Veterans head to Standing Rock

on . Posted in News

By Rich Winter

With a convoy of Veterans from across the United States headed north to join forces at the DAPL Pipeline Protest, local veterans gathered Saturday at the Veterans Building in Rosebud. 

While Rosebud’s Veteran Affairs Program Director, Orlando Morrison couldn’t make the trip, he and the, about-15 local Veterans, had a pep in their step as they loaded the vans full of food, blankets, and warm clothes for what they assumed would be a long trip to North Dakota, and a trip fraught with nervousness and in some cases apprehension. 

Iraqi War Veteran and Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Information Technology Director, Dion Reynolds, who spent time at the Keystone XL Pipeline protest, was excited to get the trip started. 

“It’s kinda the old military deal, a band of brothers. We all have experiences that are similar,” Reynolds said. “Whenever we get up there it’s going to be exciting. We get to bond with other Warriors that have done things from Vietnam to Korea, all the way to what I’ve been through in Iraq.”

Reynolds, and his local band of brothers headed to North Dakota, unsure of how the pipeline proceedings would pan out. 

“I guess it’s really an open book. From all the things I’ve seen on TV, all the accounts of violence and what not up there I think that there is a lot of exposure up there, it’s going to be more of a media thing,” Reynolds said. “Having all of those veterans up there is going to show that it’s not just the natives vs. Morton County, It’s more than that. To me Morton County is just the pawns in the game. They’re just going to keep coming those billionaire oil companies are the ones that we’re really against. It’s really becoming an us vs. them (Morton County) thing and that’s not really what it’s about. We’re trying to save the environment.”

Reynolds comments came Saturday morning, and by Sunday afternoon, news surfaced that the Army Corps. of Engineers had blocked the easement for the pipeline to go under Lake Oahe. 

With news that local Veterans were traveling to North Dakota, local volunteers, led by the Sicangu Youth Council, and others, stepped forward to donate, food, gas money, clothing, blankets and other warm-weather gear. 

On receiving those donations, Reynolds said, “I really think this is something  the community, the Rosebud and all other Native American communities are proud of.” 

Reynolds and the other Veterans returned home Monday afternoon.

Are we doing enough to create a bullying free environment

on . Posted in News

By Rich Winter

On a chilly Thursday morning, Todd County Middle School Principal Dana Haukaas is sifting through a pile of screen-shots that her students have turned into her, showing what they think is bullying behavior by one of their classmates.

While the job of pouring over Facebook screen-shots isn’t all consuming, Haukaas says 98 percent of the cases she deals with are coming from cyber-bullying on the internet. 

While bullying is something that happens, and happens all too often, the very act of bullying can be misunderstood, overused and perpetuated from kids who may not even know why they’re bullying. 

While some incidents of bullying are caught, dealt with and appropriately handled, bullying can and does have deadly consequences. 

A 14-year old Indiana girl who hung herself in front of a bus stop so her bullies could see her - Why did I deserve this pain?…Have you ever thought about what you said to me? huh… maybe not! because you killed me every day…. You told me so much that I started believing it. And I was stupid for doing that. Every morning, day, night I look in the mirror and cry, and replay the harmful words in my head.

 P.S. it’s bullying that killed me. Please get justice.

12-year old jumped to her death...I’m jumping, I can’t take it anymore.

Upon learning of Rebecca’s suicide, 14-year-old Guadalupe Shaw – the alleged ringleader of the “Mean Girls” gang allied against Rebecca – posted the following on Facebook:

    Yes ik I bullied REBECCA and she killed her self but IDGAF 

Shaw and a 12-year-old accomplice were arrested and charged with aggravated stalking.

St. Francis Indian School 

While the above mentioned incidents are extreme examples, educators within the Todd County School District and St. Francis School District are surprised by the number of bullying incidents and just how quickly they can escalate. 

The very act of bullying, according to Haukaas seems to get muddied with students, parents and others failing to understand the difference between bullying and conflict. 

“With bullying, there is a power in-balance...It’s usually people that can’t stand up for themselves or having a hard time doing that,” Haukaas said. “Conflict is when we’re equally engaged...I say something, you say something back, and then I get my friends involved and you get your friends involved. In that case it’s a conflict and not bullying.” 

Over the next few week’s the Todd County Tribune will bring you an exclusive look at bullying, how it’s affecting our children and how we can take a look at our own behavior and perhaps adjust accordingly to put a dent in bullying behavior.

Part 11 tells the bullying story from the students point of view. 

 

Water is Sacred - Feds say no to DAPL Pipeline

on . Posted in News

By Rich Winter

Archambault calls stoppage an historic moment

Amidst freezing temperatures, snow covered ground and among thousands of protestors, including U.S. Veterans from across the United States, tears of joy and whoops of celebration, chanting and drumming rattled the North Dakota landscape when it was announced the Army Corp. of Engineers would be looking for an alternate route and undergoing further environmental studies before any permanent decision about the Dakota Access pipeline would be made. 

Standing Rock Sioux, Tribal President, Dave Archambault, called the stoppage of the pipeline a monumental day for his people. 

“This is an historic moment,” Archambault said in a prepared statement. “For centuries, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and tribes across the country, have faced fundamental injustice at the hands of the federal government - which time and again took our lands and tried to destroy our way of life. Our Treaties and our human rights were ignored, our interests in protecting lands and waters were considered unimportant, and our voices were not heard.”

Archambault said the action by the Army Corps of Engineers strongly vindicates what the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has been saying all along - That they had a responsibility to protect our waters for future generations. 

The decision to not grant the easement for the pipeline to go under Lake Oahe, drew immediate condemnation from North Dakota politicians, and the energy partners behind the pipeline. 

Energy Transfer Partners and Sunoco Logistics Partners, the corporations behind the Dakota Access Pipeline, said in a statement Sunday night they “fully expect to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting in and around Lake Oahe.”

The company suggested Sunday’s decision doesn’t change past court decisions.

“Nothing this Administration has done today changes that in any way,” the company said in a statement.

North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven, a Republican, said last week after a meeting with the transition team that Trump supported completing the 1,172-mile long proposed pipeline, that would transport 470,000 barrels of oil a day across four states. A spokeswoman for Trump did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Sunday’s decision.

House Speaker Paul Ryan tweeted his criticism, calling the intervention “big-government decision-making at its worst. I look forward to putting this anti-energy presidency behind us.”

It was that kind of talk that had Rosebud Sioux Tribe President, Willie Kindle cautiously optimistic Monday morning in council chambers.

“We’re pretty happy with what the Corp.  decided to do,” Kindle said. “We met with them two weeks ago up in Rapid City, we pleaded our case to them as to why they shouldn’t issue that permit. Apparently they listened, however, I don’t want to be too optimistic about it because when they change administration’s, this could all change again.” 

Protesting in prayer: 

Since the protests began earlier this year, messages from both native and non-native spiritual leaders has always been to protest in a peaceful manner. Mother Lauren Stanley, an Episcopal priest on the Rosebud, made several trips to North Dakota. This past weekend, Stanley was asked to be a trauma chaplain with worries of Veterans in attendance being affected by PTSD (Post-traumatic stress disorder) because of the stress of the situation and the sheer enormity of thousands of people all gathered together in peaceful protest. 

“I truly believe that the Standing Rock tribe’s commitment to prayer and peacefulness made all the difference in defeating the Dakota Access Pipeline,”  Stanley said. “From Chief Arvol Looking Horse and Chairman Dave Archambault and leaders like LaDonna Allard and Phyllis Young and so many others, the message has been the same: This stand against the pipeline has been based in prayer and peace. And as a woman of prayer myself, I can say that those prayers, and that commitment to peace, made this victory possible.

 Stanley was called to be one of 32 experienced trauma chaplains to work with the thousands of veterans who came to the Standing Rock this past weekend for the veterans’ action. “To be here on the very day that the Army Corps decided definitely that there would be no permit is incredible. Like so many here, I cried at the news.”

Danny Gangone, who works with the Rosebud Episcopal Mission, has been to the Standing Rock numerous times, bringing supplies and working in the Sacred Stone camp. He was helping put up a tent for chaplains when he heard the call to the sacred fire. 

“I was humbled by the joy I saw in our people,” he said. “I was and am proud of our people. You could feel the emotional response from everyone in the camps when we all got the news.”

Archambault echoed feelings of prayer being a major contributor that led to Sunday’s decision. 

“With peace and prayer, indigenous people from hundreds of Tribes said: our future is too important. We can no longer be ignored. The goal was to protect these sacred waters, and to do so in the name of our children,” Archambault said. “And, with yesterday’s decision, it is clear that our voices have at long last been heard.” 

While Sunday’s decision from the Government does not guarantee the pipeline won’t eventually find it’s way under Lake Oahe, Archambault, and many other’s concerned about possible destruction to the environment celebrated what they said is a monumental victory. 

“While today is a great day, there is still much that needs to be done to protect Tribal rights and ensure justice for indigenous people everywhere,” Archambault said. “Using peace and prayer as our guideposts, and with the teachings of our elders and with inspiration from our youth, I believe there is much we can accomplish for the future.”

  

Council-person pending resolution of Ethics Charges

on . Posted in News

RE: Motion Excerpt from December 2, 2016 Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Tribal Council meeting.

Please be advised that the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Council met on December 1, 2016 and the following motion was made and approved.

Motion by Mike Boltz to appoint a special council to start the complaint process against Patricia Douville (Ring Thunder) for refusing a drug test. Seconded by Arnetta Montoya, question by James Leader Charge. The vote was 15 in favor, 0 opposed and 0 not voting. MOTION CARRIED.

Motion by Arnette Montoya to suspend Patricia Douville without pay until her charges are resolved and her pay remain in escrow. Seconded by Mike Boltz. Question by William Long. The vote was 15 in favor, 0 opposed and 0 not voting. Motion Carried.

Valandra / Herman smash state qualifying standards

on . Posted in Sports

By Rich Winter

Generally the first track meet of the year is an opportunity to stretch the legs, get out on the track and see where your at.

For Todd County athletes, Caelyn Valandra and Kelsie Herman, it was a chance to blow past state qualifying standards and punch their tickets to the state track meet. 

Valandra destroyed the field in the 400 meters, clocking a 60.4. The 7th grader came back later in the day to scorch the field in the 200 meters with a time of 26.5. That 26.5 put a scare into Suzanne Mealer’s school record of 26.34, set in 1993.

After a cold and windy early afternoon, the winds subsided and Kelsie Herman took her turn, blowing out an 11:59 3200 meters to easily break the state qualifying standard. 

Quote from Kornely:

It was a terrific effort from the girls who won the 4x800 (missed state qualifying by 2 seconds 10:15) and the medley relay, the 1600 meters (Karli Prue) and finished 2nd in the team standings, trailing team winner, Kimball/While Lake, by just six team points (110-104). 

The Todd County boys were similarly impressive, finishing in second (Gregory) in the team standings while having a number of outstanding performances. 

Ty Herman won the 100 )11.7), Austin Hammer won the long jump (19’1”) and the boys won the 4x800 relay, the medley relay and the 4x400 relay to finish off a spectacular first day on the track. 

Girls team standings: Kimball/White Lake 110, Todd County 104, Colome 64,  Chamberlain 61, Gregory 54, Winner 47, Platte-Geddes 46, Lyman County 45, Bennett County 11, Jones County 5, St. Francis Indian 4

Girls results: 

100 meters:

4th - Raven Patton 14.1

200 meters:

1st - Caelyn Valandra 26.5

400 meters:

1st - Caelyn Valandra 60.4

800 meters:

3rd - Karli Prue 2:43

1600 meters:

1st - Karli Prue 5:56

2nd - Amory Prue 5:57

3200 meters:

1st - Kelsie Herman - 11:59

2nd - Amory Prue - 13:11

300 hurdles:

4th - Kylie Randall - 56.3

4x100 relay: 

3rd - Todd County - 57.9

4x200 relay:

3rd - Todd County 1:59.1

4x800 relay:

1st - Todd County - 10:15 (Raven Cournoyer, Karlie Prue, Kelsie Herman and Caelyn Valandra)

Medley relay: 

1st - Todd County 4:43.2 (Gabby Iron Heart, Alanis Murray, Caelyn Valandra and Raven Cournoyer)

Long jump:

5th - Raven Cournoyer - 13’10”

Boys team results: 

Gregory 156, Todd County 99, Platte-Geddes 64, Winner 52, Chamberlain 51, Colome 44, Bennett County 39, Kimball/White Lake 13, St. Francis Indian 6, Lyman 4, Jones County 3

Boys results: 

100 meters:

1st - Ty Herman (11.7)

400 meters:

2nd - Bryce Hammer 56

800 meters:

2nd - Jesse Allen 2:13

1600 meters:

2nd - Jesse Allen 4:59

3200 meters:

2nd - Lee Sharpfish - 11:10

5th - Morris Kills In Sight 12:28

110 hurdles:

3rd - Chris Fast Horse - 19.4

300 hurdles:

6th - Bryant Burnette 49.3

4x100 relay:

4th - Todd County 50.4

4x400 relay:

1st - Todd County 3:50.5 (Ty Herman, Austin Hammer, Jordan Poignee and Bryce Hammer)

4x800 relay:

1st - Todd County (Bryce Hammer 2:11, Jesse Allen, Morris Kills In Sight, Austin Hammer 2:15)

Sprint Medley:

1st - Todd  County -= Bryce Hammer, Ty Herman, Jordan Poignee and Austin Hammer 3:53.5

Long jump:

1st - Austin Hammer - 19’1”

Triple Jump:

4th - Lee Sharpfish - 35’1”